Research and Development

In addition to our established markets, Garrison Minerals is continually exploring new opportunities for magnesium hydroxide. Through collaboration with academic institutions and/or government agencies, we are actively investigating the following applications:


Acid Mine Drainage

The history of hard rock mining in the US (and throughout the world) has left us with many  sites (often abandoned) that discharge highly acidic wastewater that may contain dangerous levels of dissolved metals.  

Various active and passive treatment systems have been proposed and tested which raise pH and encourage precipitation of the metals in solution.  

While lime is traditionally utilized, there is an interesting case for using magnesium hydroxide due to the potential for much lower sludge volume.

Gold King mine in San Juan County, Colorado.  Source:  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 

Gold King mine in San Juan County, Colorado.  Source:  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 

WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery) The waste face (front of the waste stacks) from Panel 7, Room 7 is neatly stacked with Magnesium Oxide (MgO) bags on top.  Source: US Dept. of Energy

WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery) The waste face (front of the waste stacks) from Panel 7, Room 7 is neatly stacked with Magnesium Oxide (MgO) bags on top.  Source: US Dept. of Energy

Nuclear Waste Disposal

Currently, the best system we have for safely isolating nuclear waste is to bury it in deep underground salt formations and allow the natural settling of the surrounding geology to seal off the waste compartments.  There exists however, the possibility that highly acidic brine water could make it’s way into contact with the waste.  If unmitigated, this scenario could result in radioactive material being dissolved and mobilized into the surrounding water table.  

To defend against the possibility of acid intrusion, magnesium hydroxide (or magnesium oxide) is placed around the waste material, forming an ‘engineered barrier’.